HALTER TYPING

AIMHCNZ Inc events and shows may incorporate the following sections:-

  • Foundation

  • Classic

  • Modern

Halter typing is a cornerstone of AIMHCNZ Inc.  It has been implemented to ensure that a level playing field is created in the show ring to encourage people with older or unfashionable types of miniature horse to return to the show ring. 

Other types may be introduced if a type of horse is introduced into the miniature horse show ring that doesn't reasonably fit into any existing category.

Horses will be assessed in accordance with the Horse Typing Assessment Policy

Foundation
Youngstock Mare
Stallion Gelding

  1. Foundation horses are small and compact.

  2. They have sturdy bone and a thicker hair coat, particularly the mane, tail and around the fetlocks.

  3. The head may be slightly larger and the neck is often stouter by comparison with a normal sized horse, but overall the animal is not unusually or abnormally proportioned.

  4. The ears tend to be small.

  5. A large eye is favoured, well set between a wide forehead. Dish or straight face is favoured over roman nose.

  6. A good sloping shoulder with the neck coming out of the shoulder so the head and neck is held high rather than coming straight out from the body. The crest should be in balance with the rest of the body. A stallion will be expected to have a larger crest.

  7. The body and legs should form a square. Some exhibits may be slightly rectangular in appearance. This is forgiven slightly in a mare, but is not recommended in geldings or stallions.

  8. Legs must be straight. Cow or sickle hocks, over or behind at the knee, club feet, turned out or twisted legs, wide behind, bowed tendons, unsightly windgalls, splints, enlarged joints and any other conformation abnormality are to be penalised.

  9. The chest should be broad. An overly narrow chest is not recommended.

  10. Tailset may be low, but if it is not, this is not to be penalised.

  11. A thick, flowing mane and tail.

  12. These are strong, stocky little horses which are cob-like in appearance but without excessive feathering.

Classic
Youngstock Mare
Stallion Gelding

  1. Classic horses are finer than their foundation cousins.

  2. They are longer in the leg and finer boned.

  3. The head is refined with a dished or straight profile.

  4. The ears tend to be average to small.

  5. A large eye is favoured, well set between a wide forehead. Dish or straight face is favoured over roman nose.

  6. A good sloping shoulder with the neck coming out of the shoulder so the head and neck is arched. The crest should be in balance with the rest of the body.

  7. This horse must be well balanced with good symmetry. The body and legs should form a square. Some exhibits may be slightly rectangular in appearance. This is not recommended.

  8. The body should be strong, well muscled, good width to the chest, level back, flat croup and powerful hindquarters

  9. Legs must be straight. Cow or sickle hocks, over or behind at the knee, club feet, turned out or twisted legs, wide behind, bowed tendons, unsightly windgalls, splints, enlarged joints, weak hocks and pasterns and any other conformation abnormality are to be penalised.

  10. The length of foreleg should be greater than the depth of body

  11. Tailset should be high, but a low tailset is not to be penalised unless it detracts from the overall impression of the horse.

  12. Overall appearance is of a well balanced little horse with good proportions similar in type to an Anglo-Arab Horse.

  13. NOTE:  Horses that have no modern breeding, but display more modern characteristics than classic characteristics should be assessed by AIMHCNZ Inc Affiliated Club Assessors to determine whether they should show in the Classic or Modern ring. 

Modern (For horses with modern characteristics - will include most American Shetlands (AS) and Derivatives)

The aim of the Modern ring is to preserve the Classic horse ring for miniature horses as we knew them in 2010 prior to the influence of the American Shetland Pony.  Horses bred in later years with this modern breeding including, but not limited to, mini x AS and AS derivatives will most likely* fall into this category.
Weanling American Shetland Senior Mare American Shetland
Stallion American Shetland Gelding American Shetland
2 year old American Shetland Derivative Cat B 50% Youngstock American Shetland Derivatives Cat B
Yearling American Shetland Derivative Cat A 33% Yearling American Shetland Derivative Cat B 33%

  1. Modern horses are refined.

  2. They are longer in the leg and finer boned than their classic cousins.

  3. The head should be carried high on a well arched neck which should be symmetrical and proportionate to the body.

  4. The jaw should be fine (a teacup muzzle) with flaring nostrils.

  5. Throatlatch should be refined.

  6. The ears should be short, sharp and erect.

  7. A large eye is favoured, well set between a wide forehead. Dish or straight face is favoured over roman nose.

  8. A good sloping shoulder with the neck coming high out of the shoulder.

  9. This horse must be well balanced with good symmetry. The body and legs should form a square, except youngstock which may be taller than they are long.

  10. The body should have a trim, tight barrel with a clearly defined wither, be short coupled and have a level back and flat croup,

  11. Legs must be straight. Cow or sickle hocks, over or behind at the knee, club feet, turned out or twisted legs, wide behind, bowed tendons, unsightly windgalls, splints, enlarged joints, weak hocks and pasterns and any other conformation abnormality are to be penalised.

  12. Mane and tail should be full. Tailset should be high.

  13. Movement tends to be rolling with good flexibility in the knees and hocks.

  14. Overall appearance is of a very refined small horse similar in type to an American Shetland Pony, or Hackney.

  15. *NOTE:  While most horses with modern breeding will fit into this category, we recognise that occasionally, a horse may display more classic or even foundation characteristics.  Some horses will be borderline.  If you have a horse with modern breeding that you think should show in the classic ring, please have your horse assessed by AIMHCNZ Inc Affiliated Club Assessors to determine where it should show.